Month: March 2018

Marketing Fail: Worthless Savings

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When you get an email from a business you just finished patronizing and the subject line of the email reads like the one above, you are going to open it and see what savings you are receiving because you know you probably will go back again.

Savings Inside

This little tag, phrase, sentence, whatever you want to call it, has become rather popular these days. You see it in your emails. You see it when you are shopping online but haven’t signed into the website yet. You see it in texts from stores you’ve agreed to receive marketing texts from. You’ll even see it on the outside of junk mail (of the “snail mail” variety) envelopes trying to entice you to open it in the hopes the contents will actually help you in some way.

I’ll admit, I am a sucker for a good deal and have a hard time passing it up when it is an actual, bona-fide, good deal. I like saving money, who doesn’t? I mean, if I had money to burn, who cares what the price is – money is no object at that point! But, like most of you, I find myself pinching pennies at the end of the month and getting creative with the budget. So, “Savings Inside” is enticing and it could be the next great deal.

The problem is that in many cases the good deal is anything but a good deal. Most companies just hope you haven’t done any shopping around or offer so little actual value that in the long run you probably would have just been better to not have purchased it in the first place. Some examples you may have seen:

  1. The exceptions/exclusions area of coupons – some of these areas have so many exclusions that you literally can only buy like four items in the entire store. (see a Best Buy birthday reward coupon)
  2. Bed, Bath, and Beyond – they like to run the exact same coupon every week (in email or mailer) of 20% off your purchase. Every week! They might as well just lower all their prices by 20%…makes me feel sorry for the people who shop there without a coupon.
  3.  Any store that offers 10% off of something – the saving is so low, you barely save the cost of the sales tax.

Anyway, back to the latest fail at marketing. This one is by the local Toyota dealership and it came about three days after visiting for oil changes on my cars. I just spent well over a $100 there, so I was looking forward to some savings for the next visit. Take a look at the “savings” in the “coupons” below.

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Did you read them carefully? See any savings? Yeah, me neither. Apparently the only savings here is “free information.”

The head scratcher here is that they bothered to put an expiration date on their “free information” and “coupon codes”, which of course are good for nothing.

I wish I could say this was a one-off, or a glitch, but I get these “offers” from the dealership fairly often. My guess is they don’t have anyone really paying attention to their marketing, even though they say they “are here for me.”

So, we are left to click and hope (or if you are into the snail mail thing, rip and hope) that there really is savings “in the mail.” In the meantime, make sure you read the fine print!

Do you have any worthless savings stories or examples? Share below.

Accountability of Weight: Update #1


This is the first update installment for the year-long project of returning my physical self to much lighter version of the past.

I’ll try to keep it short so as to not bore you with lots of details and try to just cover some of the lowlights and highlights, cutting to the chase at the end.


I am off to a slow start, physically, that is. I chose not to join a gym and I chose not to buy any exercise equipment. I figure if I am going to do this right, and do it for the rest of my life, that I should have a lifestyle change rather than a “quick-fix, make me feel good in the moment” type change. So, I set my step counter to a higher number than I had previously and attempted to reach that mark.

Yes, you probably caught the “attempted” in that last sentence. I say that because an every day effort in the last month has been difficult. I live in the Northwest and there is wet…and cold…and sometimes even snow and ice…and it is dark for major portions of the day. They sound like excuses, and they are of sorts. BUT, I have had at least one day a week where I go over my step goal and typically I have another day or two that are close. So, I am getting more steps in, but not really making a conscious effort at this point to make that happen.


I have purposely not done a lot of the physical activity because I have decided to start more with watching the type of food and how much of that food I put in my body. THAT is a big step because that not only requires a physical lifestyle change, but also a mental one.

My job now doesn’t lend itself to much movement and so I find myself getting munchie. It is easy to plow through snacks without really taking notice of how much I have consumed. So, food – type and how much – has been my focus this month. Places I have made changes and track in a food app:

  1. Eat some fruit or veggies for breakfast, to go along with my coffee (I never/rarely ate breakfast, so this has been a weird shift).
  2. I am aware of how much water I am drinking, or not, and aim to get three to four 16.9 ounce bottles of water.
  3. I am limiting the amount of calories during lunch.
  4. I am working on portion size and not getting seconds at dinner.
  5. I try not to eat after a certain time at night (except for maybe some popcorn, because popcorn is life).

Over the last month, the changes have been good and I anticipate they will continue to improve as I develop good habits and find what works, and doesn’t work, for me.

The Chase:

210 = official starting weight 2/15/18

-5.2 = pounds lost as of the morning of 3/11

204.8 = current weight

Thanks for you thoughts and encouragement as the journey continues!

Hold your applause: PR stunts for the naive

Public Relation on word collage

I was going to write about this earlier, but the fact is that when it is a hot topic and you have no time, it is hard to get ahead of those who write for a living. So, I’ll just preface a professionally written article with my two cents of analysis.

Public Relations is a hard thing for companies, but when they have the right atmosphere a PR stunt can garner them a lot of positive attention. We witnessed such a perfect PR storm this last week that it can’t be denied for what it really is. Many Americans applauded and ate it up, but my take is that many of those Americans are really naive to think the decisions were made based on some moral guide, superiority, or an actual political stand.

PR stunt Olympics

Companies this last week have been announcing they will no longer sell assault style weapons, raising sales ages to 21, banning bump stocks, etc., etc., etc. They are all basically designed to make it more difficult to legally buy these types of weapons or supplies. On the surface, this is a great PR win for the companies but it is really just a stunt for press attention.

Why do I say these moves are just PR stunts? Let’s be real here. There is no moral fortitude being used when it costs you nothing to make a stand. I don’t have real hard numbers here but I would bet if you looked over these companies financial statements you would find that gun sales are a small, small percentage of their overall sales. By extension, that would mean the sales of the specific weapons they are now demonizing are a fraction of a percent in their overall sales. If your PR stunt involves a small fraction of your overall sales, it doesn’t cost you anything to make a stand. But what it does do is help naive Americans think you are the greatest thing since sliced bread.

A few examples:

  • Dick’s Sporting Goods/Field & Stream – the first of the big stores to announce the ban and restrictions. Let’s be honest, not the first place most people would think to go to buy a weapon! Dick’s sells more shoes, shorts, baseball gloves, and golf clubs than it sells guns. That’s their bread and butter, so guns sales is an afterthought for them. *Personal note – The firearm section in my local Dick’s is so small and limited that it is a joke to even think of shopping there. Most of the time, I forget they even have them.*
  • Walmart – What are they known for? Everything under the sun (most of the time) at low prices. Yes, they have a small section of firearms but this is not your go to destination for firearms. They even admit they have sold these types of guns, but they just don’t sell. (That would be because people who are serious about anything don’t shop at Walmart, they go to a specialty store.)
  • Kroger/Fred Meyer – Again, what are they known for? Clothes, groceries, and home goods. Firearms is not a major source of revenue for them. *Personal Note – I was actually surprised to see a small firearms section magically appear in our local store a few years back. It seemed totally random and out of the blue.*

Listen, a PR stunt is a PR stunt and there no real stand being taken here.

The fact is, there are laws on the books to keep bad people from getting guns and when they are followed they work a vast majority of the time. Are there ways around them and are they fool-proof? No. Nothing is perfect. I am not that naive. Could we do more? Maybe. But for me it comes down to “just because we can doesn’t mean we should.” These things are a slippery slope and are much like government entitlements (once you give them it becomes difficult to take them away), only in the opposite direction – once you take someone’s right away, it becomes difficult to give it back.


Check out the great article below which was published before I could publish my conclusions:

Gun-control proponents shouldn’t be so quick to praise corporations.

Source: Corporations only break with the gun industry when it’s cheap and easy – The Washington Post